Aysha Peltz

Aysha Peltz

My pots are an imagined space; through them I build landscape and terrain. I abstract pottery form relying on the familiarity of the pot to invite the viewer to discover layers of reference. I want my pots to be pleasing to look at while provoking memories of the viewer’s experience.

Much of my current work is larger in scale than many domestic pots. I enjoy working to the limits of my body size. The memory left in my work as a remnant of my process is not from fingertips but from my body. Working on a larger scale changes the way you view the pot. The larger scale complicates the pots association with use helping the viewer to access the other references that the pots carry.

Directness is a quality I hope my work conveys. Directness is related to how I use the ceramic process. It results from making a pot that grows from the process naturally and comfortably. It is through submerging myself deep in the ceramic process — the clay, the wheel and the fire — that I facilitate directness. While I am consciously making decisions about what type of pot I am making and how it will be finished, I am open to and informed by the surprises that occur along the way.